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Oracle 1z0-821 Oracle Solaris 11 System Administration exam dumps vce, practice test questions, study guide & video training course to study and pass quickly and easily. Oracle 1z0-821 Oracle Solaris 11 System Administration exam dumps & practice test questions and answers. You need avanset vce exam simulator in order to study the Oracle 1z0-821 certification exam dumps & Oracle 1z0-821 practice test questions in vce format.

Installing Oracle Solaris 11

9. For the Exam

Now that we've explained how to install Solaris 11, here's what we need to focus on. For the exam, you need to be able to explain the differences in the interactive installations, and that means knowing when to use the text-based installer and when to use the live CD installer. Now, you typically use the text-based installer when installing a server, or when installing on a system that has a low-end graphics card, or even when the system doesn't have sufficient RAM to use the live CD installer. You typically use the live CD installer itself when you want to, say, play around with Solaris Eleven and not install it to the hard drive. You also may want to use it when you're doing a standalone installation and you just want to use the GUI and have it go nice and simple with no issues. You also need to understand what the different hardware requirements are for the different installers. There aren't many differences, but there are a few depending on whether you use the text-based installation, the live CD, or the automated installer. You also need to understand how to verify and troubleshoot an installation. And we talked about a couple of ways to accomplish this. First, make sure that everything works, and that means the network connection, the Internet connection, different hardware devices, the file system, and so forth. If it works, you know you've got a good installation. If there were error messages during the installation or things aren't working or the installation just completely failed, then you need to know where to look for troubleshooting. For troubleshooting, it's typically going to be a hardware compatibility or functionality issue. You're going to have to go and make sure that the hardware is compatible with Solaris Eleven and that you have the appropriate device drivers for it. You can find out this information on the Oracle site for Solaris Eleven. You also may want to understand just the very basics of the automated installer, what it's used for, and when it's used. And typically it's used to install a network-based repository installation that has different images and different characteristics of each image for the network, and you'll use the automated installer for that. That's typically all you need to know about the automated installer at this point. So for the exam, study those things, and I will tell you that a very good source of information you can use, other than basically just doing it yourself and practising on a Solaris allowed installation, is reviewing the Oracle documentation that's on the Oracle site about Solaris Eleven, and there's a lot of it. There is some really good information on troubleshooting and installing, and just some general information about Solaris 11 itself. So take a look at that as well. It's a very good resource, and obviously studying this VTC course will help you out a lot for the exam as well.

Updating and Managing Packages

1. Exam Objectives

Now let's move on to our next subject, and let's talk about updating and managing software packages. If you've used other package management software on Linux distributions or even older Solaris, you should be fine on Solaris 11. Solaris Eleven uses a new system called the Image Packaging System, or IPS. If you ever use things like Aptget, Deepackage, or even Red Hat's Package Manager, then you're going to be very adept at using IPS. It's very similar to the package managers for the OCA package management exam objectives. What we want you to be able to do is explain IPS, to kind of understand how it's used and what it's for. We want to be able to update Soleris Eleven using IPS. We also want to be able to manage any software package on the system using both the GUI Package Manager and the command-line interface. We'll also discuss how IPS will help you administer boot environments. Now, boot environments are basically different environments that you can boot into with different boot images, if you will. For systems that contain different software versions and different tools, you can create those using IPS. We also want you to be able to troubleshoot any software update issues that you might encounter with Solaris Eleven. and of course we'll be using IPS for that. So, having said all that, let's go ahead and move into discussing what IPS really is and how it works.

2. Image Packaging System (IPS)

Let's go over a brief overview of what the Image Packaging System, or IPS, is. Now, first of all, it's new to Solaris Eleven, so you have the pleasure of working with a new package manager that has never been used before. Four, it's a little bit different, and it replaces the old package manager found in Solaris Ten and earlier versions of Solaris. things like SVR four.Now, Solaris Eleven will still use some SVR Four packages, so you don't have to worry about backwards compatibility. But it's best to use IPS if you can. Now, what IPS allows you to do is do basically anything you want to do with a software package. You can list them, search them, install them, update them, and remove software packages for Solaris Eleven. Now, obviously, what you can do with these packages really depends a lot on what your privilege level is. Obviously, a normal user is not going to be able to do everything there is to do with a package. It requires elevated privileges to install an update, for example, but a normal user can typically list them. Now, software is typically distributed via this package management system, the Internet, or network-based repositories, so it can be obtained from a network server or the Internet. You can have local package archives on the system itself and point your IPS toward those. Now, IPS comes as both a command-line interface and a GUI. So for those of you who are command-line junkies out there, there's plenty to go around with IPS at the command line, and for those of you who are more comfortable with the GUI interface, And of course, there's that for you as well. Typically, as with most things in Unix and Linux, what you can do at the command line is probably a little bit more and a lot more powerful than what you can do with the GUI. However, it will take time to learn those things. So you can start out with the GUI and still do a lot of things with packages. Now, IPS is used to do a lot of different things, so let's discuss some of them here. First of all, we know that it can help manage all the software on the box. Furthermore, all software refers to software packages. On a Solaris box, software is viewed as a package in this manner. You can also manage software publishers. You can add them, delete them, and so forth. A publisher is someone who puts out or publishes a software package. And sometimes it can be Oracle itself, or a third-party vendor, or maybe even someone from the community. IPS can also be used to manage repositories. You can add or delete repositories, or create them. You can point your IPS to network-based repositories on a server, Internet-based repositories, or even local repositories on your box. You can also use IPS to create images, and an image is basically an installation. And you can basically baseline your image, change things with IPS, snapshot it or back it up, and then put it out as a bootable environment. And you don't have to make these changes stick. You can revert back to the image you had if you like. So you can test new operating system packages without damaging your system. You can also create and manage boot environments. And that's really what these images are: our boot environments. You could have an image that's a baseline image, snapshot it or back it up, make changes to it, and boot off that particular image at any time. And you can maintain several of these boot environments. Let's talk about some terms so you'll know what we're discussing when we mention some of these things later on in dealing with IPS. First of all, there's a text document called a manifest, and it contains metadata that describes an IPS package. It has information about the repository, about the publisher, and so forth, as well as the contents of the package. And speaking of repositories, we've already mentioned them, but basically a repository is a network or internet location, like on a file server, where packages are published and where you can get packages from. Typically, you use something called a "Universal Resource Identifier," or Uri, and it typically looks a lot like a URL you might see in a web address. Now, an image is a location where IPS packages can be installed, and that image may be the image that's on your computer right now. So you would install things on that image, make changes to that image, and possibly boot off that image or revert back to the previous image. Now, there's also a thing called a catalog. And a catalogue lists all the packages in a given repository, whether it's a network-based repository or an Internet-based repository. A package archive itself is a file that contains publisher information and the packages that the publisher provides. And the package archives are typically a local package on your box that you can point IPS at too, and it can use that package to install software. You also have something called a mirror. Now, this is also a repository; it may be an alternate repository, and it can contain package content itself. It may or may not contain all the different things that are in the primary repository. It's just like a secondary storage location where you can go to get a package. And finally, a bootable environment, or a bootable instance of an image. And an image is basically the operating system. And you can have different boot environments. And each of these boot environments can be a little bit different, have different software installed on them, or even different versions. You can also choose to cycle through these different boot environments, booting to different environments with different software packages. IPS can help you create and manage those boot environments. So those are just a few of the terms that we discuss and you'll get to know. Yeah. Some of these terms will come up as we go through the next few sessions when we discuss IPS in detail.

3. Updating Solaris 11 with IPS

Over the next few sessions we're going to look at updating Solaris Eleven with IPS, the image packaging system. Now, IPS comes in two different forms on Solaris 11, and it's installed by default and ready to go. You have the GUI version and the command-line version. Now, if you go back to a few sessions ago, when we talked about some of the definitions, we know that a repository has packages that can be installed on a Solaris 11 system. And IPS actually comes with a default repository of Solaris from Oracle by default. And this repository is basically used to update Solaris 11 after an installation and periodically. Now you can add other repositories as well, and we'll do that over the next couple of sessions. The software packages that we can get froma repository include updates, security patches and evennew software, utilities, applications and so forth. Now, regardless of which interface you use, the GUI or the command line interface, there's one important thing you have to have for IPS, and that's a good Internet connection. You don't want a shaky Internet connection when you're trying to download a large package simply because it could go corrupt and not be installed properly, if at all. So make sure you have a really good Internet connection. Now, you can also put repositories on network servers, but again, you'd have to have a good network connection to your network that has that repository on it. Now let's go ahead and take a quick tour of Package Manager, the GUI version of IPS. And again over the next few sessions, we'll look at the command line interface, we'll look at managing the boot environment, we'll look at adding repositories, and so forth. Now, we're in our Solaris 11 box and virtual box, of course. And one of the things I want to draw your attention to is that immediately after installation on a new system, you'll see a couple of icons on the desktop, and one of them will be the Add more software icon, and opening that, or rather, clicking that, will get you the package manager for IPS. A couple of other ways to get to the package manager include an icon on the taskbar here, looking in the system under administration, and going to the package manager. Let's go ahead and open the IPS package manager up.Now, initially we see a menu here that has things like "updates" and "refresh," and obviously you can check to see if updates are available and you can refresh packages and so forth. You can also install and update packages or remove them. Now they're greyed out, but we'll do a demonstration of installing packages here in a moment. Now, one of the things you might want to look at is what's installed on the desktop, or rather, what's installed on the system; you have a desktop, and you can look at the various applications, utilities, and so on that are installed. to look at applications. Obviously, there are things like the Internet Office and so forth. This will tell you everythingthat's installed on the box. You can also click on the drop-down menu here and search only for things like Solaris or All Publishers. And if we click on Solaris, that will be the repository that comes by default on the system after it refreshes. Let's go ahead and take a quick look at something. Let's go ahead and do a search for something called Brazil, and let's do a search on it. And actually, we're going to see from this little icon here that it's already installed. Now Brazil is a known-based CD/DVD burner, and so we can search for packages to see if they're already installed already.And this one, Brazil, is a very good CD burner, and if you've used Linux, it can be installed in Ubuntu, Open, South, and so forth. It gives you some information about the files that you use from this package and about some dependencies it has. Now, from here, we can also remove this package if we like. Okay, you don't have to leave that in there. We can slim down our packages if we want to. The other thing I want to show you is the Update button. Let's go ahead and click on that. And what's going to happen is that IPS is going to go out to the repository and look to see if there are any new updates that need to be downloaded. The first thing it will do is make sure the package manager is up to date, and it will update it if necessary. It will also check the catalogue and refresh it for the repository. And remember, a catalogue is a listing of packages in the repository and then a look at package information from the repository itself. Now, right now, there are no updates available because we have a fairly recent install. So let's go ahead and close this. And that's how we would update the system if we needed to. And it's very easy to do, and we can also have it go out periodically and update as well. So that's package management in a nutshell. and in later sessions we'll show you how to use it to install packages or remove them as well.

4. Managing Software Packages pt. 1

Now in this session and the next one after this, we're going to look at managing software packages. For this session, we're going to look at the package manager, the GUI. Now I'll give you a quick tour of what I mentioned earlier. And during this part of the course, we're actually going to show you how to install and remove packages using the package manager. Now the GUI is not as functional as the command line interface, but it pretty much allows you to do anything you need to on a day-to-day basis, such as installing and removing packages, adding and removing repositories, adding and removing publishers, and just listing packages and repositories. So pretty much all the common tasks you can do in the GUI Let's go ahead and take a quick look at Package Manager and install and remove some packages. All right, back in Celebrity Eleven, again, looking at the package manager, the first thing I'd like to do is show you how to remove a package. And I'm going to remove something that's kind of innocuous, something that we really don't need too much, and that's the default Firefox bookmarks. So I've looked through the installed packages in the applications on the left-hand side and found what I want to uninstall. Now I'm just going to click "remove." Now sometimes there will be some details about the package, such as dependencies and things like that. But this is a very simple package to remove. So we're going to go ahead and proceed, and it's going to look at the package information. It may go online and look for something such as package metadata and so forth. Typically, this won't take very long, depending upon the size of the package and the complexity of the package. If it's a large one, it has a lot of dependencies and is connected to a lot of other applications and utilities, and it may take a while. but typically for smaller packages such as this one, it should not take very long at all. It's giving us some status onit and it's updating our image. Now that's important to know. And you'll know why when we talk aboutboot environments, when we discuss boot environments, we'lltalk about updating the images and giving usdifferent boot environments to work with. So we're still updating the image here. Again, it shouldn't take very long. And it says it successfully removed the package. So that's very easy to do. And that was a very simple package to remove. So let's go ahead and look at installing a package. Let's go look at our Solaris repository, the only one we have, and I've already picked out a package for us to install. Actually, I'm going to go to Applications and Office here and I'm going to go ahead and install the Planner, which is a project management software package that's in the Solaris package. So let's click "Install Update" here. It's going to talk about the package we need to install. I'm going to click Proceed, and it's going to look at the package information from the repository. It will look at the catalog. It will look at the metadata of the package. It will probably decide what kind of dependencies it needs. If it needs to install any additional packages or software, then it'll go ahead and do that. so it's downloading the package now. And this is only a very small package, 3.19 megabytes. Again, this could take some time, depending upon your Internet connection speed. That's really why you need a high-speed Internet connection if possible, such as a cable modem, DSL, T1, leasing, or whatever. Now it's downloaded, it's installing it, and it's updating our image. Again, this is important to note because when we talk about boot environments, we'll talk about how updating packages can change the image. So we can have multiple images in multiple boot environments. So we've successfully completed our installation. We have a new package in there, and that's the Planner application. So it's very easy to use. Package manager. The GUI. And in the next session, we'll talk about doing more things with the command line interface. You.

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